Are we creating tender moments or shattering them?

Updated: Apr 11



What are we allowing to be overshadowed?


So often the fast pace of our lives seems to overshadow events that don’t exhibit some form of urgency or importance. Perhaps we miss a child’s performance in a school play because of some other deadline we believe to be more urgent.


Perhaps we’re late for dinner with our family because of something we believe is more important.


The Birth of Jesus Christ created an annual celebration that constantly reminds us that there are events that, while not seeming to be urgent or vitally important are actually the ones that bring the most to our lives: a child’s grin as she ties her shoes for the first time; a young hockey player who scores his first goal; a new bride entering the room with her first turkey deliciously browned; a Dad’s consoling touch as he warms cold hands that lost their mittens; a grandmother’s tear sliding down a smiling face as she sings to her first grandchild; an elderly man who watches a child struggle with wood and cloth and nails to make a boat fit for sailing on a pond.


Think of the tender moments that are woven into the fabric of your life, tender moments that love created.


As we enter December, let’s look first at ourselves: are our beliefs grounded in doing unto others as we would have them do unto us? It’s often referred to as the Golden Rule, and it’s all about caring for others with love.


What could we change, as soon as today, if we apply this rule to situations around us? Could we create a tender moment by encouraging someone, or thanking someone, or noting how well someone has done something?


Could we focus on listening to someone as they tell us something rather than trying to listen as we try to do something at the same time?


Even though we know how something should be done, could we listen to someone else’s idea and find some good in it? Could we perhaps even try to follow that idea, just to see how it turns out?


What if we’re the ones to bring a peaceful resolution to challenges that arise?


Let’s not be unpredictable this December. Let not be the ones who shatters a tender moment with unkind words, critical comments, or a frowning face.


As December marches along, let’s be the ones watching to create tender moments of love wrapped in encouraging words, and served with a smile so radiant it crinkles our laugh lines. And let’s find the joy in our lives. Let’s make lists of things we are grateful for.


John Kralik wrote a book called, “A Simple Act of Gratitude … How learning to say ‘Thank You’ changed my life.” It did change his life, and saying ‘thank you’ more often can change ours too!


Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. It’s different for each of us, but one thing is the same: We can do it today!

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The photo is of a Henry Bibb book at Leddy Library's Archives and Special Collections at the University of Windsor. For more information about Henry and Mary Bibb, read Irene Moore Davis (2020) artic